A Caregiver’s Online Guide: TyTips Pt. lll


8) Never lose your temper:

Find a response other than anger if/when your loved one does something that makes you angry

I know, “easier said than done” but practice makes perfect so ‘practice’:
a) Deep breathing
b) Counting to ten (or one hundred)
c) Walking out of the room
d) Telling yourself over and over that its ‘The Alz’ and not your loved one making them act the way they are (which in turn is making you mad)

…Doing whatever you need to do to squash your anger is as individual for the caregiver as the progression of the disease is for your loved one

Remember, anger only begets anger so nothing positive will result from indulging this negative emotion. Besides, your loved one will probably respond in kind or become confused or hurt, none of which should ever be our ‘intention’

9) Not everything your loved one does ‘wrong’ is an opportunity for you to show them how to do it ‘right’:

If your loved one is repeatedly engaging in the wrong behavior then they are probably past ‘teaching’ for the most part (sometimes this change in behavior can be an indication that the disease is progressing and/or other neurological changes are at play.

If you notice that they are starting to get more things ‘wrong’ or different activities/behaviors are becoming a challenge it may be time to take them to see their neurologist for a check-up)

Some behaviors can be modified or re-taught but people diagnosed with dementia have short term memory issues, impaired cognitive skills and decreased problem solving abilities so depending on what stage of the disease they are and their individual manifestations of the disease you (as their caregiver) should adjust your expectations accordingly regarding what they are capable of doing and learning

10) Never scold or chastise your loved one:

Every time something happens that is aggravating, annoying, surprising or disruptive does not necessarily give you license to ‘dress down’ your loved one using harsh words

After you have calmed down, take the time to either explain why their behavior was inappropriate, wrong or upsetting (knowing that they may or may not understand or retain what you have just said and repeat whatever has just happened)

11) Your safety comes first (yes, even above your loved ones):

Do not underestimate the power of the disease by thinking your loved one would never harm you. Do not think that your experience with their ‘non violent’ past persona has anything to do with what they are capable of in the present

If/when (heaven forbid) they become violent, it’s not the time to discuss, negotiate or make the mistake of passively thinking, “They would never hurt me” and not take steps to insure your own safety

Never hesitate to leave the room and lock the door behind you if you feel physically threatened in any way

Remember, even the airlines suggest that you ‘put the breathing device on yourself first, then on your little (loved) one’…translation, if you don’t put your safety first-then how are you going to be able to help some one else

To Be Continued: In the interim, I welcome your comments or suggestions from your own experience

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